2
$\begingroup$

I mean there are two general-purpose computer science stack exchanges: http://cs.stackexchange.com and http://cstheory.stackexchange.com. When should I prefer this site?

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

SciComp is about Computational Science, not Computer Science. Although many Computer Scientists would consider Computational Science to be a sub-discipline of Computer Science, it draws on other fields such as Computer Engineering, Mathematics, Physics, and application domains such as Biology and Chemistry. If a question is about or closely related to the topic of Scientific Computing, it is likelier to receive an expert answer here than in one of the other communities.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I accept the answer. However, if you look at the cs site, no questins are related to computers there. Furthermore, they are not because "CS is not really about computers -- as physics is not really about particle accelerators, and biology is not about Petri dishes..." Do you remember the classics? So, please understand my confusion and that your answer actually makes it only deeper. Said that, I am from the computer (not informatics) department. $\endgroup$ – Val Jan 6 '13 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not going to try and explain the difference between the CS and CS Theory sites on Stack Exchange, I didn't help start those communities :) $\endgroup$ – Aron Ahmadia Jan 6 '13 at 17:29
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I am not asking you do that. I emphasize that the content of Computer Science is the computation. Ok, I have discovered the difference explained more clearly en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computational_science $\endgroup$ – Val Jan 6 '13 at 17:34
3
$\begingroup$

Computer science, the topic of those other two sites, is about the theoretical analysis of algorithms and data structures. It could be considered a branch of fundamental mathematics.

Computational science, on the other hand, which is the topic of this site, is about effectively using computers to solve problems in other scientific fields, including physics, chemistry, biology, and even social sciences. Generally speaking, computational science is closer to the "raw numbers" than computer science.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .