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Were are quite long in the beta and things start to become a little messy -- high time to obtain some pro tem mods.

Rules:

  • A person interested in being a mod posts an answer featuring username and the link to the profile, plus an optional why-me text.
  • Nominating someone else is not allowed. Better poke this user on chat and ask to consider starting.
  • Users express their support/negation by voting, and support words/doubts as comments.
  • SE team will use the results as a tip who to select.
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  • $\begingroup$ You might also want to add some some notes about what is expected of a moderator (see the current P.SX election page) with suggestion that all prospective moderators should be familiar with the Stack Exchange Theory of Moderation. Also it might be good to add specific questions, such as Why do you want to be a moderator?, What have you already done for the community? and What are your goals as a moderator?. $\endgroup$ – Mark Booth Jan 24 '12 at 13:49
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I'm willing to moderate. I visit the site every day (partly because I'm looking to network within the community for a job, and partly because I like learning more about scientific computing). I'm finishing up my thesis on model reduction in combustion, which focuses a lot on optimization methods, linear algebra, and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations; I think my answers reflect that. I've also done some scientific software development, and would like to get more involved in understanding best practices in the community. I think this site is a great resource for people to learn more about scientific computing, especially since the field is still evolving as a discipline, and hasn't reached the point where it has gained widespread acceptance as an academic department. I was trained as a chemical engineer, and definitely wish that a site like this were around four or five years ago to answer questions I had as a PhD student starting out. I'd like to help this site get off the ground so that it can help current and future computational scientists.

Update: I'd like to be a moderator to help make the site better and grow its membership, as well as to connect with people in the computational science community. I contacted the people in my computational science fellowship program to post a description and links to the web site on their Facebook and LinkedIn pages. I've also been active on Meta, soliciting opinions about moderation and scope issues, and posting questions where I try to figure out how to help grow the site to emulate more mature Stack Exchange sites. As a pro tem mod, I've been active in commenting, voting, resolving flags, and closing (and even reopening) questions. I read and understood the Theory of Moderation before agreeing to mod, although since this is my first experience in moderating a forum, I expect my term as pro tem mod (and possibly elected mod) to continue to be a learning experience. One thing that I think I can do better as a mod is to continue to visit the Teacher's Lounge and solicit advice from experienced moderators and Stack Exchange personnel. So far, I've visited the Teacher's Lounge a few times to talk with other mods about migrating questions, and on some moderating matters, I've consulted the community for guidance. I think that in the future, I will use the Teacher's Lounge as more of a resource, in addition to what I've already done.

Right now, I'm moderating in addition to interviewing for jobs and finishing up my PhD program, and so far, there don't seem to have been any issues with regards to the time I've put in. Given that an engineering PhD requires the same amount of time per week (40-70 hours per week) as a job, and that I'm applying to positions where I'd expect the same level of time commitment in a job (research staff positions and postdocs in computational science), I don't foresee the expected time commitment to be an issue. I would think that the most difficult times for me to moderate would be ramping up a project or around grant deadlines, but these should be temporary situations. If time commitments ever become an issue, I would step down as moderator.

In terms of having goals as a mod, I think the main things I'd like to do short-term would be to look at what David's done with the FAQ and help make it look more like the Math or Physics SE FAQs. I also plan on going to the Teacher's Lounge and talking to some of the mods of SE sites to get our site on their FAQs for question referrals. I'd like to see us more concretely define our scope, but I don't think it should be so narrow as to preclude the growth of the site, since if you look at our Area 51 statistics, we could use a bit of work on the number of questions per day, number of members, and number of site visits per day. I like how David Ketcheson has articulated a "big tent" philosophy, and I believe we should promote that philosophy while still maintaining a (mostly) distinct scope from related SE sites like Math, CrossValidated, Physics, and so on. There's been a lot of healthy debate on what the scope should be, and I'd like to see the outcomes of those debates transferred to the FAQ along with links to the relevant meta questions. Long term, I'd like to grow the site membership, and I'm always open to ideas about how to do that. I've talked with aeismail about avenues in the chemical engineering community, and I think that people in the combustion community would be interested in the site as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ @MarkBooth: You've raised a number of good questions that the community should ask potential moderators. I've updated my answer accordingly, and I hope I've addressed those questions. If not, or if you or anyone else has additional questions, I'd be happy to revise my answer again. $\endgroup$ – Geoff Oxberry Jan 24 '12 at 19:46
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the update Geoff, I'm sure many of us who don't have the time to offer to help with moderation appreciate those who are willing to step up to the plate. $\endgroup$ – Mark Booth Jan 25 '12 at 0:25
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I'm willing, although I will sometimes have other demands that make me unavailable for a week or more at a time. I'm a numerical analyst and have been pushing the site in my professional circles. This site is my first experience with stackexchange, other than clicking google results linking to stackoverflow to find answers to all my programming questions.

Update: More recently I have become (loosely) involved in several SE sites: Physics, Math, Theoretical Physics, and LaTeX, as well as MathOverflow. Mostly I'm answering computational questions on those sites and suggesting that they be migrated here when appropriate.

I read and understand the Theory of Moderation before agreeing to be a moderator.

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I would like to moderate, but I'm not sure exactly how much time that would require... Any feedback on it would be greatly appreciated.

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  • $\begingroup$ Generally speaking on Stack Exchange, if you haven't been around for long enough to understand what being a moderator entails for other people, then you probably aren't ready be one yourself. I would start by reading A theory of Moderation though, participating on Meta and getting used to the Stack Exchange culture. $\endgroup$ – Mark Booth Jan 24 '12 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ You're probably right... I should stick around a while and learn the ropes first. Thanks for the link. I'll check it out $\endgroup$ – Paul Jan 24 '12 at 14:33

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